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Road How to make cycling training schedules

Discussion in 'Cycling Department Forum' started by Bram, Jul 1, 2016.

  1. Bram

    Bram Senior Member

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    Do we have scheduling wizards among us who love to help setup training regimes for members?
     
  2. Ryann

    Ryann Member

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    Bram likes this.
  3. Bram

    Bram Senior Member

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    Never seen those plans at Strava, thanks @Ryann will check them out :)
     
  4. Wayne Morgan

    Wayne Morgan Member

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    I'm on my first week of the Gran Fondo Beginner plan.

    Today's ride will be this:

    Endurance Miles (EM) + Steady State (SS)
    1h 30m

    Workout

    90 minutes total; include 4x8min SS intervals (5 min RBI)

    Daily Goal
    The goal for today is to become familiar with Steady State efforts. These take finding the right road, one where you can pedal hard uninterrupted for 8 minutes. When doing efforts stay focused on your power, relax your upper body, and control your breathing.

    So my question is, being a beginner, how hard is hard?
    Is it just 90rpm for the whole 8 minutes? Is it forget about cadence and just whack it in a big gear and just go for it?

    They just seem a bit vague especially for someone new to cycling and there terminology.
     
  5. Wayne Morgan

    Wayne Morgan Member

    16
    10
    I'm on my first week of the Gran Fondo Beginner plan.

    Today's ride will be this:

    Endurance Miles (EM) + Steady State (SS)
    1h 30m

    Workout

    90 minutes total; include 4x8min SS intervals (5 min RBI)

    Daily Goal
    The goal for today is to become familiar with Steady State efforts. These take finding the right road, one where you can pedal hard uninterrupted for 8 minutes. When doing efforts stay focused on your power, relax your upper body, and control your breathing.

    So my question is, being a beginner, how hard is hard?
    Is it just 90rpm for the whole 8 minutes? Is it forget about cadence and just whack it in a big gear and just go for it?

    They just seem a bit vague especially for someone new to cycling and there terminology.
     
  6. Frederic Schornstein

    Frederic Schornstein Active Member

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    Do you have a heart rate monitor or something like that? Steady State means threshold interval. That is the amount of power you can sustain for an hour. For me as I only have a heart rate monitor it is around 175bpm. You can do some tests on flats to determine that, but it is hard to find a strectch of road where you can do a 20min full on test. A good way for me to find my threshold was climbin steep hills with around 8 to 10% which are 3 to 5km long. If I keep my heart rate around 175bpm I can do the longest climbs here (around 30min). This is the kind of effort level you are looking at. If I go slightly higher with my heart rate I cant finish the climb in one go.

    On the flat it is pretty difficult for me. Even on my quite way home I always have to brake or stop at some point and it is really essentiel to not stop the effort for some relaxing seconds. If you find a good hill in your area ride it up for 8min, go down and up again etc.
    On the flat you would need a big main road where you never have to brake.
     
  7. Wayne Morgan

    Wayne Morgan Member

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    Yeah I have a HR monitor. There is a road by me where I can go up and down, and it should just take me 8 mins to complete, so I shouldn't have a problem with that, I just don't know how hard is hard.

    When I look at my HR reading on strava I'm always either in zone 2 or 3, zone 4 is 168 or above. I guess that is my target then, 8 mins in zone 4?
     
  8. Frederic Schornstein

    Frederic Schornstein Active Member

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    Heart rate zones are specific from person to person. There are people for whom zone 4 starts at 150bpm and for some it starts at 180bpm. The best thing is if you have a longer hill 4km or so that you can just get up. For me it took some time to realize what is my threshold (Zone 4). There are a few things that are very important:
    Mind the lag of your heart rate. If you are going up to this level it can really take some time until the heart rate adjusts. I had an experience a few weeks ago where I wanted to beat my PB up the hardest climb here and I was held up in traffic just before the climb. My heart rate was pretty low at the start and I really attacked the climb and felt quite good, but it passed the 175bpm barrier to fast and I couldn't get it back down in time and had to stop after 1.3km. So that was definetely to hard.
    I personally would try to get to the start of the climb with a relatively high heart rate around 150bpm and then go up to an effort where you feel you could go at least 20min. The important thing is to try and hold a very steady effort. Not going hard, slow, hard slow.

    I have two examples here from a hard climb. In the first one I started with a bit higher heart rate and selected and effort that made my heart rate rise to Zone4. Important is to not go as hard as you can until you reach a set bpm, but select an effort and wait until HR catches up. Then I kept the effort mostly steady except for a bit of a push in the last 1 km.
    https://www.strava.com/activities/609311589/analysis/2830/3429 (I hope you can see it)

    In the next one I started at a bit lower HR and selected a higher effort (going 1 to 2 kph faster than the previous one). You can see my HR rising up to 183bpm which is to much for me to sustain on a long climb. So I tried to get it down, but finally had to stop and then struggled for the rest of the climb.
    https://www.strava.com/activities/623716171/analysis/958/1611

    I can highly recommend all the videos of GCN regarding training to power or heart rate. This plus some tough climbs really made me understand how my body works in these situations

    Here is a video how to calculate your threshold heart rate (end of Zone 4).


    Here the video I used to calculate my Zones on strava based on my threshold which is 175bpm
     
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  9. Frederic Schornstein

    Frederic Schornstein Active Member

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  10. Wayne Morgan

    Wayne Morgan Member

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    Thanks Frederic. I don't really have any climbs that long near me, it's relatively flat, with short hills.
    I'll stay on the road I've picked for today and see how that goes.
     
  11. Frederic Schornstein

    Frederic Schornstein Active Member

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    Yep, then I would try to go into the climb with the heart rate being already quite high, so you get a good indication. You just have to listen to your body. In a climb it is always good to take note of your speed as this is not so much influenced by wind etc. on most climbs and then slightly raise it, so your heart rate goes up by a few beats for every run. If you then approach a heart rate where you can't make it on the same effort level to the top you know you hit your max and you have to back off.
     
    Bram likes this.
  12. Gavin

    Gavin Member

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    Hi there,
    Can I recommend an app from the play store. It's called "PocketCoach". It will give you specific training plan to help you peak for a special event or give a schedule just to get fit. It works off HR or power. It relatively new app and worth a look.
     
    Bram likes this.
  13. Bram

    Bram Senior Member

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  14. Gavin

    Gavin Member

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    Yep that's it Bram
     
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